POETICS, AESTHETICS, COMPOSITION:

Chloé Milos Azzopardi

About the exhibition:

"I learned to deal with depersonalization by intensely observing my environment, by projecting myself into the sensations of other living things, be they plants, stones or animals."

This series draws on the crises of dissociation and depersonalization that I have been experiencing. It’s a common psychological response to trauma. These are disorders that affect a person’s ability to form a constant "self" : People living with it may not feel their body, momentarily forget their own name or what their face looks like. I learned to deal with depersonalization by intensely observing my environment, by projecting myself into the sensations of other living things, be they plants, stones or animals.  Losing some sense of individuality - where my body begins and ends also led to a struggle to understand the boundaries of my environment.

The distinction and hierarchy constructed between human and animal and between nature and culture seemed to me more and more obsolete. This series is built in echo with this trouble but also with the first sentence of Ovid’s Metamorphoses: "I want to say the forms turned into new bodies."  It suggests that bodies are not finite entities but rather changing, crossed and inhabited entities. I envision these photographs as an ecosystem in which metamorphosis is possible; an environment in which I seek to know what the notions of individuality, plurality and otherness can mean when the limits of bodies are challenged.

About Chloé:

"Being able to feel that when we observe other living beings, we are also the observed, even if what is around us does not necessarily have eyes."

Chloé Milos Azzopardi (c. 1994) is a French photographer and artist. Coming from a painting background, her approach to photography finds itself to be experimental. She received an MFA from the European School of Visual Art and currently works in Paris on long term projects where she mixes together her knowledge of installation, photography and book making. 

Her work explores the relationships between human and non-human beings, trying to get out of a prism of utility or servitude in order to imagine new inter-species connections, while her research focuses on the representation of mental health, ethology and the construction of post-capitalocene imageries.

Why we chose Chloé:

"Chloé's photos almost evoke physical feelings of touch while just looking at them."

Daniela:

When I firstly discovered Chloé's photos, I was fascinated by their strength and tenderness at the same time. Her process of projection into the sensations of subjects in her photographs feels so real it almost evokes physical feelings of touch while just looking at them.